How the Workplace Can Adjust for Individuals with Dyslexia

dyslexia in the workplace

We are on day four of Dyslexia Awareness Week in conjunction with the British Dyslexic Association (BDA)!

There have been some really inspiring stories, such as teenager Jack Harley-Walsh who, after being faced many obstacles with his dyslexia, has started his dream course at university. It’s great to see so many uplifting experiences being shared, as these stories are a reminder that with the right support and equipment, individuals with the condition can adapt well to the classroom and the workplace.

Helping Each Person Adjust

Since the 2010 equality act, it’s the law to ensure that employees with dyslexia are not discriminated against and that workplaces are able to provide reasonable changes to ensure they offer a dyslexic-friendly environment. It’s important to note that when making changes in the workplace that each individual is assessed so their severity levels can be determined.

There are many solutions that can benefit employees with dyslexia in the workplace such as:

  • Installing a dyslexic friendly font onto the individual’s computer, as it enhances readability
  • Providing digital recording devices that can help with the individual’s note-taking skills, such as Sonoscent Audio Notetaker
  • Mind mapping software, which offers the individual a framework for thinking, fleshing out ideas and constructing presentations
  • Text to speech software that allows web pages, word documents and PDFs be read aloud to the employee
  • Ensuring that any documentation for meetings is given to the individual beforehand, so they can have time to process and prepare
  • Visual stress software, such as ClaroView, which amongst many things allows the user to change the screen colour and offers a screen ruler for tracking

dyslexia in the workplaceIf you have dyslexia, it can also help if you discuss it with your work colleagues (if you want to, of course), as some people may not fully understand the condition. By doing this, it helps your colleagues with how they can support you so you can master every task.

Even better, iansyst run dyslexia awareness sessions for the workplace, which will place your colleagues into the shoes of someone who has the condition and really get to understand the everyday challenges of dyslexia.

At iansyst, we are continually offering new software and solutions that can help with dyslexia, whether in the workplace or classroom. We provide assistive technology that can offer reading, writing and spelling support, plus a range of hardware such as scanning pens, digital recorders and headsets that can increase productivity.

If you have any questions about our assistive technology or training sessions, please ring on 01223 420 101.

How Can Teachers Support Dyslexic Students?

dyslexia support

To continue our support for the British Dyslexic Association’s (BDA) Dyslexia Awareness Week, we want to look at how teachers can help their students who are affected by the condition.  When it comes to diagnosing dyslexia, teachers can be critical to this process as they are more likely to spot early signs of dyslexia in children.

Since there are 1.2 million children in the UK who have dyslexia, it’s integral that teachers have the knowledge to support students who are affected and help them develop coping strategies, so they can reach their full potential.

Offering Dyslexia Support

Dyslexia affects each person differently, so it’s important that teachers use a range of different methods to help with each student’s performance.

dyslexic support When planning a lesson, take into account that each exercise contains instructions that are straight to the point and omits any unnecessary detail and words.  Keep to simple, clear sentences and make sure the layout is straight forward so it’s easier for the student to follow.

By inserting diagrams and images into your exercises, this makes it easier for students to understand the instructions, especially if they don’t know every word. Again, spacing out instructions and making sure the text is broken up can help relieve eye strain and increase readability.

Try and insert different background colours and fonts, which can give weight to the text and ensure that it’s visually easier for the student to digest. At iansyst, we offer a selection of products that helps relieve visual stress, such as colour overlays that aids with the student’s reading fluency and duration.

It’s also important to look out for areas where students with dyslexia thrive. Understandably, dyslexia can affect self-esteem and is sometimes thought of as being a disadvantage in the workplace and classroom, so it’s especially important to encourage their strengths. It has been observed that children with dyslexia are creative, have strong reasoning and problem solving skills and are great team players.

If you wish to learn more on how you can help your students who are affected by the condition, we have a range of assistive technology that offers dyslexia support such as our text-to-speech software such as ClaroRead and our Texthelp Read and Write.

For more information on our products, don’t hesitate to get in touch with a member of our team on 01223 420101.

 

Identifying Early Signs of Dyslexia in Children

Today marks the start of Dyslexia Awareness Week (2nd – 6th of October) in association with the British Dyslexia Association (BDA)! At iansyst, we hope this week will encourage you to share your thoughts and experiences, whether you have the condition yourself or if you are a parent of a child with dyslexia.

Dyslexia Awareness Week

Dyslexia can affect a person’s reading, writing and spelling but it can also affect other areas such as working memory, sequencing, orientation, time management and much more. The severity levels differ from each individual, so not everyone with the condition will experience the same symptoms, so it’s important to understand what to look out for, especially if you are a teacher or parent. Since dyslexia affects an estimated one in ten people in the UK, being able to identify the condition early can help those who are affected, so each individual can receive the relevant support and tools to increase their confidence for their time at school and throughout the later stages of their life.

Early Signs of Dyslexia

Dyslexia becomes more apparent in children once they reach school, however it can be possible to detect signs in preschool children. Symptoms can include:

  • Problems with speech, such as not being able to pronounce longer words and getting words mixed up
  • Unable to express themselves, either having difficulty articulating sentences or remembering words.
  • They may finding rhyming difficult and have little interest in the alphabet

You may also detect a delay in their speech development for their age group, however it’s important to point out this this can also be linked with problems other than dyslexia.

Signs of Dyslexia in School Children

When children reach school age, this is when symptoms become more present, as they are encourage to read, write and spell on a daily basis. It’s important to look out for the following:

  • Poor and inconsistent spelling, such as adding and omitting letters
  • Difficulty reading aloud and regularly making errors
  • Poor handwriting
  • Struggling to carry out directions
  • Having trouble learning sequences such as the months of the year
  • Poor phonological awareness
  • Slow writing speed

Dyslexia doesn’t have a cure but there are lots of tools out there to overcome any difficulties faced by the condition. At iansyst, we have dedicated assistive technology to help you or your child fulfil their potential and instil confidence. We offer a range of products, such as Typing Tutors, text-to-speech and note taking software and equipment that relieves visual stress.

For more information on our full range of products, please take a look at our website or if you have any questions, ring us on 01223 420 101.

Haverhill optician helping dyslexic children

dyslexic-childrenAn optician in Haverhill is helping to raise awareness of dyslexia.

With Dyslexia Awareness Week taking placefrom November 3rd to 9th, an optician in Haverhill is partaking in a seven-day event to show support to those with the condition.

Wardale Williams optician practice on Camps Road will be providing locals with useful information and advice in a bid to raise awareness of dyslexia, the Haverhill Echo reports.

Dyslexia is a learning difficulty that primarily affects the way people read and spell words. According to the NHS, one in every ten people in the UK have a certain degree of dyslexia.

This year, the awareness week theme is Dyslexia Matters, with a focus on encouraging and helping those who have the learning difficulty.

During the seven-day event, Wardale Williams will be offering patients a free coloured overlays assessment and showcasing the new intuitive colorimeter – both of which can determine the specific colour that will help dyslexic people to significantly improve their reading skills.

Joanna Williams, senior optometrist at Wardale Williams, said: “Many people with dyslexia find reading difficult because they experience peculiar visual symptoms when looking at a printed page – words may move, blur in and out of focus or run into each other.

“However, for some people with dyslexia these symptoms can be reduced by the use of carefully applied colour and are treated by using either coloured overlays on text, or by wearing specially tinted glasses.”

But despite colorimetry having the potential to enhance the reading skills, learning ability and future prospects of some dyslexic people, the method can be less beneficial for children.

When youngsters with dyslexia experience strange visual symptoms on a printed page, they often don’t complain because they believe that what they see is normal. Subsequently, this can lead to them performing poorly in school, which will affect their ability to progress.

Therefore, if you think your child may have dyslexia, it’s worth speaking to their school to arrange an assessment.
There are many ways schools and parents can support a dyslexic child, including using assistive technologies. For example, the Nessy Learning Programme is a digital software tool comprising a series of interactive games and activities designed to boost the reading and writing skills of children with learning difficulties.

(Credit image: Thinkstock)