Ghotit Version 5 Software to Support Dyslexia

Ghotit Real Writer and Reader 5

This month, we have launched Ghotit Real Writer & Reader 5 on dyslexic.com – a brand new version of the reading and writing software which supports individuals with dyslexia, dysgraphia and other learning disabilities. If you would like to find out more about the software and how it could help you, please comment on our blog below!

 

What is Ghotit Real Writer and Reader?

Ghotit LogoGhotit Real Writer and Reader is assistive technology software that helps people overcome many of the common issues that are faced whilst writing text. It includes patented technology which provides the most appropriate corrections for spelling, grammar and punctuation mistakes by looking at the intended meaning of the piece of text.

 

What new features does version 5 bring?

The brand new version of Ghotit Real Writer and Reader brings a wealth of new features to help those with dyslexia to read and write:

  • Quick-spell word prediction with instant correction
  • Context-sensitive and phonetic spell checker to correct words such as ‘notest’ to ‘noticed’
  • Advanced grammar and punctuation corrector
  • Effective proof-reader
  • Speech feedback
  • Integrated English dictionary which supports US, UK, Canadian, Australian, New Zealand and South African English
  • Reading assistance with dual highlighting
  • Screenshot reader to read aloud any text on the screen to read text from images, locked PDF files and inaccessible documents
  • Word banks for word prediction based on different topics
  • Integration with all text editing applications
  • Standalone “Dyslexia Text Editor”

 

How does the software support dyslexic people?

The software is a great tool for those with dyslexia as it tackles many of the common problems that they may face whilst writing. This includes difficulties with reading, writing, spelling, proofing and accessing documents in different formats.

 

You can purchase the new software online by following this link to Ghotit Real Writer and Reader 5 on dyslexic.com.

Latest Assistive Technology

latest-assistive-technology-from-iansyst

As the power of computers increases, so too does the range of features that assistivetechnology solutions can offer. Each new version of a product can include moreand more exciting solutions to everyday problems that disabled people face.Below are just a few examples of some of the new developments that areavailable to purchase from iansyst.

ClaroRead is a popular text to speechsoftware package that has recently been updated to its seventh edition. ClaroRead 7 includes a range of upgradedfeatures that make it easier and more helpful than ever before. As you wouldexpect, it is fully compatible with both Microsoft 10 and windows edge. TheClaro voice setup gives you access to 80 different voices to choose from. Italso comes with an exciting new feature called Claro cloud, allowing you toinstall your software across multiple devices, for instance you could have oneat home, one at work and one at university so the software is always there when youneed it.

latest Assistive Technology

There is also anew addition to the range of Dragonvoice recognition products. DragonProfessional Individual builds on all the great features that are found inthe previous edition by introducing some exciting new features. It includes anew proofreading feature that plays back the original recording alongsidehighlighting the spoken work in the transcribed text. Making it quick and easyto make sure that your transcription is 100% accurate. In addition to this, anycustom words or commands that you set whilst using Dragon Professional Individual are now saved to the cloud, meaningthat they will work on any dragon product that you are logged into withouthaving to set them up again for each device.

For those thatfind text on a screen too small to read easily Supernova is an excellent solution that many people find helpful.Fully compatible with windows 10, and with touch screen machines. It allows youto magnify any aria of the screen up to 64 times. It also includes a screenreader that can read onscreen text, or can read aloud what you type, making ita comprehensive assistive tool for those with visual impairments.

If you have anyquestions about the above products. Or other solutions that we have to offer,feel free to give us a call. Our experienced team are always at hand to helpyou find the perfect solution to your needs.

Rachel Ingham: How does ClaroRead benefit dyslexic learners?

This is an image of Rachel InghamBy Rachel Ingham, Dyslexia (SpLD Consultant)

@RInghamUSL

The obvious benefits of using text to voice software, such as ClaroRead, need little explanation. It reads Word and PowerPoint documents, emails, the Internet and EBooks. This provides a wealth of educational and career benefits as well as providing a way to make reading a pleasure. However, like most technology, it can be underutilised. I would like to share some of the ways I have used ClaroRead to increase the learning potential for children and young people in the classroom. Its benefits in the workplace will follow in a future blog.

There were some compensations for being a teacher with dyslexia. One of them being I understood the difficulties of learning to read and the frustrations of being unable to read and comprehend in order to write and learn. Although I loved literature, the effort of reading lessened the pleasure and reduced the number of books I was able to read as reading was so laborious.

ClaroRead breaks down the barriers for the learner with dyslexic related reading difficulties by reading the unfamiliar words that cannot be easily decoded. It allows learners of all ages to independently access more complex informative text increasing the inclusive learning environment for individual or collaborative class based tasks. This independence allows the learner to choose areas of particular interest, motivating and enthusing them to research subjects further.

Problems with phonological processing for the learner with dyslexia are a well documented cause of reading difficulties. These difficulties can be ameliorated with good teaching increasing reading fluency and accuracy. Despite this, comprehension is often still negatively affected because of the level of cognitive processing required to decode, inhibiting the reader’s ability to gain a full understanding of the text. When text is read aloud the listener does not have to focus on the decoding, providing greater opportunity for comprehension and critical assessment of the information being studied.

Less understood are the problems relating to language and language development in the learner with dyslexia. ClaroRead provides the opportunity for the vital exposure to new words, often subject related, that are not commonly used in speech. Without the facility of accessing reading material with automaticity, the dyslexic learner’s vocabulary development is impaired which, in turn, affects their communication and writing skills.

A perpetual problem for some readers with dyslexia is the interference of other voices making it difficult to read with comprehension. With ClaroRead, the busy classroom is no longer an inhibitory factor as the learner can listen to the text through headphones. In addition, this provides an advantage of their hands being free to record the relevant data without losing their place in the text and thus enabling them to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding.

One of the greatest benefits of ClaroRead is as a proof reader. Learners, particularly those with dyslexia and or visual stress, miss many spelling errors and grammatical mistakes despite their dedicated efforts to seek them out. ClaroRead reads exactly what is written so the writer can hear what they have written ‘Brian breaks reduce stress in the learner’ instead of ‘Brain breaks reduce stress in the learner.’ It can also identify homophones which is crucial for the proof reader with dyslexia who is often unsure which homophone is the correct option. Picture or context descriptors help the homophone selection.

Not only is this a more effective method of proof reading, it is less arduous for the writer who has already put considerable effort into engaging with the difficult skill of committing their ideas to paper.

I often wonder if this history student would have recognised their mistake if they had used ClaroRead.

“It was important for the king to have the support of the no balls in court …”

Another advantage of ClaroRead for proof reading is that you can slow the voice of the reader supporting the slower verbal processing skills of the learner with dyslexia. Slowing the speed at which ClaroRead reads has an added advantage of providing time to record notes and to critically think about the reading material. Notes recorded for revision purposes can be revisited repeatedly without the constraints imposed by reading.

Everyone benefits from the use of ClaroRead in the classroom. Firstly, the learners are able to read more complex, informative text and gain more knowledge and understand with increased confidence. ClaroRead creates independence by reducing the anxiety and embarrassment caused by having to ask classmates and friends for help. Class discussion and collaborative learning settings are a lot more rewarding for all involved. Secondly, the teacher has a more inclusive classroom with engaged learners who can make independent progress.

We have discussed academic advantages and will close by acknowledging the positive aspect of being able to read for pleasure. To enhance this further the listener can choose the accent they would prefer, Heather from Scotland being a particular soothing choice. There are times when learners are required to learn to read and others when we should create the opportunity to enjoy literature without a needless struggle.

Dyslexia Awareness Week: Speech Recognition

Speech recognition is software which allows you to transform your spoken words into digital text on your computer. It also enables you to navigate around the computer, create and edit documents, surf the web or send an email, all through the power of your voice. A good quality noise-cancelling microphone is often used with speech recognition software to obtain the best results.

Often those with dyslexia can talk about what they want to write, but when it comes to typing out their sentence it takes much longer. Speech recognition helps with this issue as not typing or spelling skills are required, so all of the individual’s attention can be focused on thinking about the content. Speech recognition is up to 3 times faster than typing.

What software is available?

Nuance’s Dragon software is very popular amongst those with dyslexia. It comes in a number of different versions, all of which are available to purchase on Dyslexic.com.

Dragon NaturallySpeaking Premium delivers fast speech recognition to boost productivity for the user. Upon installation, the user must read out a small paragraph in order to ‘train’ the software (this takes no longer than a few minutes to set up). They can then speak into their microphone or headset and see their spoken words transformed into typed text. They can launch applications, select menu items, execute key functions, switch windows, search the web, create and send emails, and much more, all through using their voice. It gives the individual the ability to work hands-free if desired and get more of their work done faster. Dragon Premium is available as a box copy and digital download for Windows. Follow this link to find out more >> http://ian.lt/1OlqZzx

Dragon for Mac works in the same way as Dragon Premium; however it has just been upgraded to the latest version for Mac and is 15% more accurate than its previous version. Due to the leap in Apple Mac technology, Dragon for Mac can be used without a headset or external microphone if required, and can be used with the built-in Mac microphone. Dragon for Mac is available as a box copy and digital download for Mac. Follow this link to find out more >> http://ian.lt/1LyFCR4

Dragon Professional Individual is much more advanced than other versions and delivers fast speech recognition at work to boost productivity. Users can transcribe voice notes from their smartphone or Nuance approved digital voice recorder and convert this to digital text quickly, easily and accurately. Create customisations and personalisation features to shortcut repetitive tasks, for example, saying ‘insert signature’ and Dragon will fill in your contact details. Dictate industry specific terminology and Dragon will type every word correctly with the ability to import custom vocabularies. Dragon Professional Individual is available as a box copy and digital download for Windows. Follow this link to find out more >> http://ian.lt/1L8rAQw

Dragon Anywhere, which will be available this autumn on iOS and Android, is a new, cloud based mobile app that offers professional dictation to users. Create and edit documents, reports and more, using customised vocabulary, voice shortcuts and auto-text commands. The app automatically synchronises auto-text commands and custom words with Dragon for Mac or Dragon Professional Individual desktop editions for seamless productivity in the office or on the go. Dragon Anywhere will be available as a subscription based application from autumn 2015. Call us on +44 (0) 1223 420101 to find out more.

What hardware is available?

We recommend Andrea Electronics headsets and microphones to accompany your Speech Recognition software. Andrea headsets have the highest voice recognition industry rating and have noise-cancelling technology which means the accuracy of your software is greatly improved. If you would like to find out more about Andrea Electronics products, please follow this link >> http://ian.lt/1JUBiUW

Dyslexia Awareness Week: Text-to-Speech Software

Text-to-speech enables your computer to read aloud web pages, text documents, emails and PDF documents in a natural sounding voice. Some software now includes additional tools such as spell checkers, homophone support and visual highlighting that can help when producing your own written work.

Those with dyslexia often find that text-to-speech software provides significant support if they struggle with reading or digesting text on the computer screen. Hearing text being read aloud in a natural sounding voice also helps dyslexic people proof-read their own written work. For some people it is much easier to hear the mistakes than see them.

Most importantly, text-to-speech software can offer those with dyslexia a high degree of independence when it comes to reading and writing.

What software is available?

There are different types of text-to-speech software available, all of which can be purchased from Dyslexic.com.

ClaroRead is a simple toolbar that sits at the top of the computer screen and will read aloud any on-screen text in Microsoft Word, Adobe Reader, Internet Explorer, emails and many other applications. It contains visual highlighting to help users follow the text as it is read aloud, word prediction feature, homophone checker, coloured overlays and much more. It is available to purchase as a box copy or digital download (instant product sent via email), and for Windows and Mac. Find out more about ClaroRead by following this link >> http://ian.lt/1MTZiMy

Read&Write is an easy-to-use toolbar that provides speech feedback, phonetic spell checking and many other literacy support tools to help with reading and writing. It also contains written and picture dictionaries to help understand the meanings of tricky words and homophones, translation tool, screen masking and word prediction feature. It is available to purchase as a digital download or as a USB, and for Windows and Mac. Find out more about Read&Write by following this link >> http://ian.lt/1L1AWOe

Kurzweil 3000 is a powerful text-to-speech and literacy support tool that enables users to convert printed text documents into accessible electronic formats. This can then be read aloud by a natural sounding voice. It comes with dual highlighting (highlights a sentence, line or phrase in one colour, and each word in another colour to help improve reading performance), translation feature, word prediction and much more. It is available to purchase as a box copy for Windows and Mac. Find out more about Kurzweil 3000 >> http://ian.lt/1L1HUTe

Penfriend gives dyslexic users the confidence to write more, the accuracy to write what they mean, and the speed to write more in the time available. It contains text-to-speech functionality to read aloud words on the screen, including words that haven’t been typed yet. It also features word prediction, using a dictionary of known words, to help the user with writing. Penfriend XL adds additional functionality in native languages. It is available as a box copy for Windows. Find out more about Penfriend by following this link >> http://ian.lt/1hli83P

Nuance launch exciting new Dragon Products

This week, Nuance held a live webinar to announce the launch of an exciting portfolio of Dragon speech recognition solutions. Dragon has been helping people with their work for over 15 years and the latest additions to their range will not disappoint. These new products enable seamless synchronization of key Dragon features across PC, Mac, iOS, and Android through the cloud.

“The time-consuming nature of documentation and paperwork can place considerable productivity constraints on organisations and individual professionals alike,” said Peter Mahoney, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Dragon. “By expanding our Dragon portfolio, we are extending the benefits of robust speech recognition and transcription across the workforce. Now, organisations can better manage their speech deployments, professionals can increase their productivity in the office, and field workers can complete their documentation in a more timely and convenient manner.”

Dragon Anywhere, which will be available this autumn on iOS and Android, is a new, cloud based mobile app that offers professional dictation to users. Create and edit documents, reports and more, using customised vocabulary, voice shortcuts and auto-text commands. The app automatically synchronises auto-text commands and custom words with Dragon for Mac or Dragon Professional Individual desktop editions for seamless productivity in the office or on the go. Dragon Anywhere will be available as a subscription based application from autumn 2015.

dragon-professional-individual-boxshot-png-left-uk

Dragon Professional Individual is a brand new version of Dragon for PC and now includes advanced capabilities to customise words, automate repetitive tasks, and create auto-text to insert frequently used text. It makes it easy to dictate, edit and format documents, emails, forms and more, and reduces the physical strain of typing. With the integration of the new Dragon Anywhere app, professionals are able to work anywhere with seamless productivity. Dragon Professional Individual will be available from September. It will also be available as an upgrade for users with Dragon Premium or Professional, versions 12 and higher (call us on 01223 420101 to find out more).

Dragon Professional Group is the latest enterprise-ready solution and includes Dragon Professional Group speech recognition software, Dragon Anywhere for mobile employees and the Nuance User Management Centre. The Nuance User Management Centre allows administrators to monitor and manage licences, manage or share customised words, commands and auto-texts, across multiple users. It can be deployed and managed across organisations as part of a corporate licence. Dragon Professional will be available in autumn 2015.dragon-for-mac-5-boxshot-png-right-uk

 

Dragon for Mac is the final addition to the Dragon family and the latest version brings a huge leap in accuracy. It is 15% more accurate than its previous version and delivers much greater speed. A new user interface makes it easier to access key features, add custom words and add commands. Dragon for Mac will be available from early September. It will also be available as an upgrade for users of Dragon Dictate for Mac versions 3 and higher (call us on 01223 420101 to find out more).

Language development could be hereditary, according to study

The development of language during infancy could be determined by genetic factors, new research has suggested.

At around ten to 15 months of age, infants begin to produce words, with their range of vocabulary increasing as they grow older. Typically, a child will have a vocabulary of 50,000 words by the time they finish secondary school.

Researchers at the University of Bristol along with colleagues from around the world set out to investigate whether there is a link between genetic changes near the ROBO2 gene – which may be responsible for helping infants to produce sounds and develop language – and the number of words spoken by children in the first stages of language development.

They analysed data from over 10,000 children, assessing their level of expressive vocabulary at 15 to 18 months of age and at 24 to 30 months of age.

A genetic link was found in the early phase of language acquisition at 15 to 18 months, when infants typically communicate with single words.

The ROBO2 gene is responsible for producing the ROBO2 protein, which is associated with language development. This protein also interacts with other ROBO proteins that have been linked to problems with reading and storing speech sounds.

The results provided further insight into a specific genetic region on chromosome three – implicated in learning difficulties such as dyslexia.

Dr Beate St Pourcin, lead researcher at the university, said: “This research helps us to better understand the genetic factors which may be involved in the early language development in healthy children, particularly at a time when children speak with single words only, and strengthens the link between ROBO proteins and a variety of linguistic skills in humans.”

With the study revealing that genetics play a significant part in language development, steps can therefore be taken at an early stage to help those who have dyslexia. One effective method involves using interactive assistive technologies, which can contribute towards improving the reading, speech and writing skills of children with this learning difficulty.

Happy  mother talking with  baby boy
Happy mother talking with baby boy

Image credit: Thinkstock/iStock