Dyslexia, Moving Letters, and a Local Chip Shop!

Image of a local chip shop demonstrating dyslexia and moving letters

Thank you to Martin who sent this photo in to dyslexic.com of his local ‘chippy’ – he begged the question as to whether this is a dyslexics worst nightmare or a dream come true. Would a simple play on words like changing ‘Fish and Chips’ to ‘Chish and Fips’ help someone with dyslexia tackle the problems of moving letters?

Image of a local chip shop demonstrating dyslexia and moving letters

Symptoms of Dyslexia

It is estimated that 1 in 10 people of all ages, races, backgrounds and abilities are dyslexic. Dyslexia is a specific learning difficulty which tends to affect reading and writing, spelling, expressing ideas, organisation, time management and more. You can find out more about dyslexia in a previous blog post on dyslexic.com as part of Dyslexia Awareness Week: What is Dyslexia and where can I find support?

 

Moving Letters

As part of the reading difficulties associated with dyslexia, many people may experience visual stress. This can include seeing letters which move or look like they are back to front, causing issues with letters such as ‘d’, ‘p’ or ‘q. In some cases, visual stress can cause significant problems with reading.

Earlier this year, Victor Widell developed an online simulation using code to demonstrate what a dyslexic reader may experience. Take a look by following this link to see what it may be like to read with dyslexia. It’s important to note that not every person with dyslexia will experience this difficulty and some people may not find that letters move at all when they read.

 

What Assistive Technology Can Help With Moving Letters?

Colour plays a major part when looking to reduce the effects of visual stress. Using coloured paper such as Irlen Pukka Pads or applying Irlen Coloured Overlays over printed text often help dyslexics with visual stress. The choice of text colour used on a white background can also affect visual stress. On Dyslexic.com, we have advanced accessibility options which allow you to change both the text and background colour on our website to one that helps you with reading. (To access this, please follow the ‘Accessibility’ link at the top of the page)

 

Do you think the name of this chip shop would help you read the shop sign? Or would it make it more difficult. It’s all down to your individual preferences so there is no right or wrong answer – please comment below to let us know what you think.

Dyslexia and Visual Stress: What assistive technology can help?

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Visual stress can range from blurred letters or words, letters which move, headaches or difficulty with tracking across the page. It is a common difficulty amongst those with dyslexia. Thankfully, there are tools that can help reduce this difficulty and in turn can help with reading, and a lot of these are extremely low cost!

Many people with dyslexia can be sensitive when it comes to reading off of a white background. Simply changing the background colour can make such a difference. Pukka Pads have released a range of lined notebooks (available to purchase in a single pack or 6 pack) which are specifically designed for people who struggle writing on bright white paper. They come in a range of six Irlen Institute colours: Gold, Green, Lavender, Parrot, Rose and Turquoise. Buy online from Dyslexic.com by following this link >> http://ian.lt/1lIqDZQ

Other tools that help with reading off of a white background include coloured overlays. These are tinted plastic pages or rulers (available in a range of colours and sizes) which are placed over text to help reduce the glare and make the text easier to read. Some people can benefit from these greatly and our value multi-packs are a great way to find the right colour to help you. These include 10 Irlen Coloured Overlays and can be purchased by following this link >> http://ian.lt/1RNpnR1

We also stock Eye Lighter Reading Rulers in 4 colours which are a great alternative to full A4 coloured overlays. These reading rulers are small, discrete and will fit inside a child’s pencil case for use in the classroom. Like overlays, these can be placed over text to help make it easier to read. However, these can also be used to help with tracking across the page – due to the small size, it prevents readers losing their place. The Eye Lighter Reading Rulers can be purchased by following this link >> http://ian.lt/1As3AnL

For more advice on visual stress and dyslexia, please visit the British Dyslexia Association’s Eyes and Dyslexia page >> http://ian.lt/1NszSE9