​Dyslexia Awareness Week: Note-taking Support

There is a wide range of note-taking support available for those with dyslexia. The assistive technology can help eliminate the difficulties that are associated with writing whilst listening. It can also support with organising and editing notes that have been made.

What assistive technology is available?

There is a range of note-taking support software and hardware to help with dyslexia, all of which are available to purchase on Dyslexic.com.

Livescribe Smartpens digitally save handwritten notes on special, dotted paper, allowing the individual to make as many or as little notes, diagrams or symbols as they choose. The pen records high-quality audio and links this to the notes that have been made. This information can be digitally uploaded to a computer, where handwritten notes can be converted into digital text. You can also search your handwritten notes for particular keywords. There are different versions of Livescribe Smartpens. To find out more please follow this link >> http://ian.lt/1VH1fxY

Olympus Digital Voice Recorders are used to record the sound that is going on around you – whether that be a lecture, meeting or conversations. The latest model of voice recorder from Olympus is the DM-7, which takes recording to a whole new level. It has Wi-Fi smartphone compatibility which allows the user to link their voice recorder to their Android or iOS device and carry out remote control recordings via Wi-Fi. The Olympus voice recorders come with the Olympus Sonority software which has several editing functions, allowing you to manage your audio files. To find out more please follow this link >> http://ian.lt/1N1OwDW

Sonocent Audio Notetaker offers a visual and interactive form of note-taking. Audio recordings are transformed from a single stream of information to easy to interpret coloured bars. It is an ideal piece of assistive technology software to help those who struggle with note-taking. The software allows the user to import their audio from their computer or a portable device such as a digital voice recorder. Alternatively, the user can record audio straight into the software using a headset, microphone or the computer’s microphone. Each phrase in the recording is split into manageable sections. The user can easily manage their recording by highlighting sections that perhaps they didn’t understand or think is important into different colours. These colours can be amended and titled to mean different things for the user. They can also delete, move and edit sections. PowerPoint slides, images, and more, can be added into the file and is instantly matched up to the relevant part of audio recording. The software is available as a digital download for Mac and Windows. To find out more about Sonocent Audio Notetaker please follow this link >> http://ian.lt/1FURDhx

Olympus introduce the DM-7

This week Olympus introduced the DM-7 model – a digital recorder that promises to be much more than just a voice recorder.


The iansyst team were lucky enough to be invited to the product launch event at the impressive Dans le Noir in London. The event gave an informative overview of the key features and how these will help disabled users in their day to day lives. All attendees were able to test out the Olympus DM-7, as well as their new smartphone app, Olympus Audio Controller, to see how they worked. We were also treated to a dining in the dark experience. We were guided in by blind guides (50% of the staff at Dans le Noir are either blind or disabled) and shown to our seats. The surprise 3 course menus were bought out leaving us to try and work out what we were eating. All of the people around us were saying the same thing – you keep expecting your eyes to adjust to the darkness, but they never do. It also bought us all to try and remember the last time we were actually in complete pitch darkness, not many of us could to our surprise. Not having the use of sight really heightened our other senses. It was a truly memorable experience and something that we would recommend you to try out for yourself!

The top-of-the-range DM-7 takes recording to a whole new level with Wi-Fi smartphone compatibility, a stereo sound microphone, and a slick, intuitively-designed user interface. The Olympus Audio Controller app allows users to record from their smartphone device via Wi-Fi. For example, if a student was sat at the back of a lecture hall they could leave their DM-7 by the speaker and control the device from their smartphone at the back of the room optimising the recording quality. Another feature using the app is users can include images taken by their smartphone and use these as a handy visual index. This makes it much easier to search and manage recordings. Audio files can be instantly shared via the app to Dropbox and OneDrive. The DM-7 has a low-noise microphone that boasts a 90° outward orientation which delivers stereo sound recordings with natural ambience. There have also been huge improvements to the voice command and text-to-speech function.

You can find out more and purchase the Olympus DM-7 at a very competitive price from www.dyslexic.com. Plus, enjoy free delivery on all orders!